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Archive for the ‘literature’ Category

The new Jane Eyre movie is due out in March. There is a FaceBook page, where they have released two photos of Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre, in fashionable 19th century garb. The movie is directed by Cary Fukunaga, of Sin Nombre fame. Reports are that Mia Wasikowska read the Charlotte Bronte book and asked her agent if there were any movies of it being made.

I am so excited about seeing another version of one of my favorite book!

Two stories below:

Story at I Am Rogue

Story at Cinema Blend

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Update: Deborah Cavendish, Dowager Duchess of Devonshire, passed away on September 24, 2014, at age 94.

My commentary on the monarchy, circa 2010:

As an American activist for peace and justice, I am surprised to find myself consumed of late with stories of the English elite — the life of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire; Jane Austen novels; and the story of Lord Byron, Lady Caroline Lamb, Lord Melbourne and their circle. I have been wondering what fascinates me about these stories, and how I can be so excited about the lives of people who, in real life, I would find to be elitist, over-privileged, and ultimately knowing or unknowing cogs in an oppressive system of unfair hierarchy.

Well, I was gratified to find an article in the Guardian that at least toys with these conundrums. Finally, someone else who admires a Duchess, at least took the time to examine the role of a Duchess. (more…)

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A 19th century vignette: Well-dressed women

Some perspective: This image is from a vintage greeting card, which is a reprinted page from Godey’s Lady’s Book, a monthly magazine from the 19th century. The dresses are described as “The New Look in the 1870’s”. This time period is after Jane Austen, after the Bronte sisters, and about the time of Louisa May Alcott. Little women was published in 1868 and 1869, so these dresses are probably similar to those that the March sisters wore to their fancy dress ball.

Details from the card at the read more… (more…)

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Can Male Hatters be feminists?

Five things that critics got wrong about Alice in Wonderland,
and one critic who is on the right track.

This piece is actually a critique of the critiques of the movie Alice in Wonderland, book by Lewis Carroll, screenplay by Linda Woolverton, and direction by Tim Burton. Overall, I thought the movie was enjoyable, imaginative and enlightening. I was also surprised to find some moments of heartfelt feminism.

In looking over the reviews of the movie on line, I found a surprising lack of understanding, and some dismissive negativity, about the movie. Much—but not all—of the response was related to the issue of feminism in the film.

Here are five things that most critics got wrong about the Linda Woolverton and Tim Burton version of Alice in Wonderland: (Note, this piece is heavy on plot-spoilers. Don’t read it if you want to watch the movie and be surprised.)

  1. The litmus test for feminism is not the female star. (more…)

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Actress Mia Wasikowska, pronounced vash-i-KOV-skə, is in negotiations to star in a film version of Jane Eyre directed by American director Cary Fukunaga. Mia Wasikowska is known for her role in Edward Zwick’s film Defiance, and she portrays Alice in Wonderland in the Tim Burton movie to be released in March 2010. (more…)

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Kimberly writes: I long to blog more here at Georgiana Circle. Time and other blogging responsibilities get in the way.

I am still exploring Jane Eyre. Which, I feel somewhat guilty about. I enjoyed promoting Georgiana of Devonshire as a real-life, woman political figure. Though, I suppose someone should promote Charlotte Bronte, real-life woman author.

Anyway, for the Jane Austen fans among us, and the Jane Eyre fans, too, I stumbled upon a very interesting comedienne. She does a whole shtick about 19th century literature. Then, she sends the audience away with WWJED bracelets. (What Would Jane Eyre Do?) Now, that is cool. (Though, while I like Jane Eyre, I am not sure I would follow her lead. I think several times, she should have forgotten about the patriarch, handsome as he was, and set up a co-op business with one of the other women from the story.)

(excerpt from) Spoonfed UK
We Need to Talk Bonnets with Grainne Maguire
September 1, 2009

There is a slight air of desperation in the small Camden Head theatre.  Desperation of various Bennet sisters looking for a suitable husband, desperation of the Brontes trying to make a living by their pen while keeping their anonymity and the more immediate desperation of comedian Grainne Maguire who has realised that the ten-person audience won’t be growing and it’s time to start the show.

We Need to Talk Bonnets
is a comic monologue in which Maguire converts her obsession with 19th century literature and happy endings into a lens through which to view the real, and often much less happy, world. Tonight I am a sizable percentage of the lit geek audience that has come to Camden to hear Maguire’s performance running for three nights as part of the Camden Fringe. (more…)

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