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Posts Tagged ‘19th century literature’

Update: December 2011: Mixed news on the disposition of the “new” Charlotte Bronte manuscript. At auction, it was won by a museum, so it will still be available to the public. Though, instead of the Bronte Parsonage Museum in England, it went to a literary museum in France. Story at “The National”: here.

KW writes: For all of us Jane Eyre and Charlotte Bronte fans, this tiny book is a rare find! Written when Bronte was only 14 years old, it is a brilliant piece of satire. Bronte created this tiny work in the format of a men’s magazine. It includes a witty ad (see below), which observes economics and social justice in her usually insightful, though aloof, manner. It’s a kind of Mad Magazine for the 19th century. And, it contains a hint into her future sociological writing, such as her reflections on charity schools in Jane Eyre, and her novel, Shirley.

Bronte manuscript. Image from: i.dailymail.co.uk

(excerpt from) The Telegraph & Argus
[Brontë] Parsonage Museum in Haworth [England] is eager to ensure ‘national treasure’ is not lost to the public
UK/November 14, 2011

An appeal has been launched to help fund the purchase of a rare Charlotte Brontë manuscript.

The Brontë Parsonage Museum is appealing for financial support from the public and funding bodies.

It needs to raise up to £300,000 to cover the expected cost of buying the work at an auction next month.

The unpublished manuscript contains three works written by Charlotte – author of Jane Eyre – when she was 14.

Charlotte’s Young Men’s Magazine Number 2 contains 4,000 words set in a fictional world created by the famous literary siblings.

The book, until now in private ownership, is believed to have never before been seen by scholars. (more…)

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The new Jane Eyre movie is due out in March. There is a FaceBook page, where they have released two photos of Mia Wasikowska as Jane Eyre, in fashionable 19th century garb. The movie is directed by Cary Fukunaga, of Sin Nombre fame. Reports are that Mia Wasikowska read the Charlotte Bronte book and asked her agent if there were any movies of it being made.

I am so excited about seeing another version of one of my favorite book!

Two stories below:

Story at I Am Rogue

Story at Cinema Blend

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Kimberly writes: I long to blog more here at Georgiana Circle. Time and other blogging responsibilities get in the way.

I am still exploring Jane Eyre. Which, I feel somewhat guilty about. I enjoyed promoting Georgiana of Devonshire as a real-life, woman political figure. Though, I suppose someone should promote Charlotte Bronte, real-life woman author.

Anyway, for the Jane Austen fans among us, and the Jane Eyre fans, too, I stumbled upon a very interesting comedienne. She does a whole shtick about 19th century literature. Then, she sends the audience away with WWJED bracelets. (What Would Jane Eyre Do?) Now, that is cool. (Though, while I like Jane Eyre, I am not sure I would follow her lead. I think several times, she should have forgotten about the patriarch, handsome as he was, and set up a co-op business with one of the other women from the story.)

(excerpt from) Spoonfed UK
We Need to Talk Bonnets with Grainne Maguire
September 1, 2009

There is a slight air of desperation in the small Camden Head theatre.  Desperation of various Bennet sisters looking for a suitable husband, desperation of the Brontes trying to make a living by their pen while keeping their anonymity and the more immediate desperation of comedian Grainne Maguire who has realised that the ten-person audience won’t be growing and it’s time to start the show.

We Need to Talk Bonnets
is a comic monologue in which Maguire converts her obsession with 19th century literature and happy endings into a lens through which to view the real, and often much less happy, world. Tonight I am a sizable percentage of the lit geek audience that has come to Camden to hear Maguire’s performance running for three nights as part of the Camden Fringe. (more…)

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