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Posts Tagged ‘Fashion’

 

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My morning live-blogs about princesses, boots and politics is at onthewilderside: here.

What do I usually care about? Peace, justice, politics, fashion, feminism and English Literature. Though, like many other folks, I have been compelled to watch the human drama of the rescue of 33 men in Chile. Above is the link to my full blog. Below is my story about seeing a princess on the live-feed:

A princess…

I have been reading English literature and history and doing a personal study of “What makes a princess?” Some of what makes a princess in real life is bad – being part of a regime. Though, part of being a princess includes the beautiful side of aesthetics and humanity.

Today, I saw a princess. When the 14 th Chilean miner, Victor Zamora, was brought to the surface, his was wife there to await him. The curls of her long, flowing hair glistened like black crystals in the desert sun. She was wearing a hard hat, a required part of a vigil in somewhat dangerous territory. And, when Victor emerged into the sunlight to see his adoring wife, he reached out to hug her.  In the exuberance of their embrace, her hard hat fell to the floor like a crown. (more…)

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This is about a modern debate. Models are expected to be so skinny. So, the fashion industry tends to use models 16-years-old and under. So, they are considering rules (they now have some loose policies that are not working) about how and how much to use models under 18 years old. Interesting in a Lady Georgiana Spencer perspective. Because, Georgiana, too, was exploited for her beauty at a young age. For Georgiana, it was about being an elegant wife, and a young and talented beauty who was expected could give birth to an heir.

As New York Fashion Week rolls out runway, too-skinny model debate turns to age
By Samantha Critchell, AP / February 10th, 2010

Would older models quell too-skinny debate?

NEW YORK — The models auditioning for New York Fashion Week were undeniably thin. But it was only after the fashion industry started worrying about too-skinny models that casting agent James Scully began asking their age. (more…)

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A hat/tip to my husband, who spotted this article and realized it matched my blogging here…

(excerpt from the blog) Forest Street Kitchen
Hard Times? The New “Poverty Chic”

…In this issue [of Town and Country magazine], the Editor’s Letter focuses on the effect the recent economic downturn has had on the halcyon days of the, well, the right-up-until-a-year-ago era. She calls 2009 “the year of ‘no mores’- no more lavish spending, no more whimsical investments, no more doing things just for the hell of it.” On the following page, she comes to her senses and recommends that we consider purchasing as a Christmas gift a $325.00 chinoiserie enamel ring box. This would, I imagine, be a stocking stuffer along with a 2 carat diamond ring from Cartier (to put in the box) , a perfect black truffle, a cashmere dog sweater, and a pair of airline tickets to Anguilla. (more…)

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Stumbled upon this article. And, it is full of stuff that interests me. Hope you will read about women and fashion and being taken seriously (or not.) Also, interesting notes on Duchess author, Amanda Foreman, and woman politician, Margaret Thatcher. – Kimberly

(excerpt from) Times on Line UK

TV ‘genius’ Gail Trimble leads the march of the bluestockings

Gail Trimble has infuriated critics by both being very intelligent and refusing to have a celebrity-style makeover

by Alexandra Frean and Helen Rumbelow / February 28, 2009

Britain has a problem: we are overproducing something that we have little idea what to do with. We can’t get rid of it, and many loathe it unless it’s disguised as something else. The product? Clever women.

This week saw the “victory” of Gail Trimble, the cleverest contestant on University Challenge. Not that you would know we were celebrating.

The reaction to the 26-year-old – who is studying for a doctorate in philosophy from Oxford – swung wildly between gross sexual insults and gross sexual invitations.

The fact that she did not dress like Paris Hilton simply added to her offence. Here was a living embodiment of that favourite female stereotype: the “bluestocking” – a clever woman unbothered by looks or fashion sense… (more…)

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I loved Aretha Franklin’s inaugural hat.  And, a news story reported it was one of the most buzzed about and blogged about items from today. My husband said it was a real “going to church hat.”

Here is what I wrote about it on my other blog, where I live-blogged the day:

Aretha Franklin was wonderful. I think by her repeating and intoning, she wanted to give the blessing of and emphasize “protect” and “let freedom ring.”

Ms. Franklin wore a beautiful and unique hat, exactly what should have been worn at an occasion like this, by the Queen of Soul. Her hat was sparkly and had a big bow, but all of it — even the bow — was in gray flannel, for the season and solemnity of the occasion.

[Later in the Democracy Now! coverage, Alice Walker notes that by including Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, in the ceremonies, President Obama has acknowledged and connected with the Divine Mother.]

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My prettiest tote bag. It's handmade.

Betty Wood (r) presents Kimberly with a hand-sewn tote bag

What can one woman do to carry herself, her family, and her country safely through the current economic crisis?

Each day, more and more people are starting to feel the economic crunch. For some people, it is the loss of a job. For others, it is a home in foreclosure. For others, it is a general sense of less money, and more caution related to purchases such as food, gasoline and clothing. This holiday season brought us less shopping and less things, including less new sweaters, hats and mittens for the cold months.

In addition, there is a sense of lack brought on by the wasteful wars our country is engaged in over in Iraq and Afghanistan. And, the sense of grief and compassion for the civilians in those countries, and for the victims of the blockade and war in Gaza.

How can we respond to these events? How can we help to fix these events?

My solution is to make a partly symbolic and partly meaningful shift in the culture with a new fashion trend: applying frugality and voluntary simplicity to women’s fashion. (more…)

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What can we learn about a politician from the clothes they wear?

How can we project a political message with the clothes we wear?

These are some questions that I will be exploring in this series, “The Fashion of Politics.” This series is designed for everyone to enjoy. It will cover: men’s political fashion; women’s political fashion; third party and independent candidates; greens and Green Party candidates; political buttons and other political accessories; and fashion-politics current events, such as guessing what Michelle Obama will wear to the Inauguration Balls. Every two or three days, there will be a new post covering topics such as: “When to wear (and when not to wear) a political button”; “What should grassroots candidates wear?”; “Can real greens wear a suit?”. Illustrations will be culled from historical examples, as well as my personal collection of activism and grassroots political experience in the Green Party. I never realized how many pictures I had of greens around the country trying to look friendly and/or professional in order to win over voters.

USA 2002

Citizen Candidates: USA 2002

As a candidate myself, and as a campaign manager for many candidates, I have thought a lot about how candidates should dress. Though, even for non-candidates, fashion can express a lot about who we are and what we believe in. A statement could be as bold and obvious as a t-shirt with a political message. Or, it could be as subtle as wearing hemp jeans, or choosing a tie that is “only blue”, instead of red. I will be sharing strategies and images of people trying to project political message through fashion. I will also present some discussions and controversies I have encountered in my many years navigating the world of fashion, politics and political campaigns.

Fashion of Rulers

Fashion of Rulers

My recent focus on fashion and politics is the result of my study of Amanda Foreman’s book (and the movie based on it) “Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire.” Georgiana’s life might have turned out to be simply a contest of beauty and aesthetics with her friends of London’s aristocratic social circle, nicknamed “the Ton”. Though, Georgiana managed to blend her love for fashion and her flair for gaining attention with her desire to support the politicians and political ideas that became one of the missions of her life. Georgiana understood the power of art (more…)

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